Vol. 6, No. 9 | October 2012    Having trouble reading this email? View it online.

NDC President’s Message:
Hello 2013

Helvi Sandvik
Helvi Sandvik

October begins a new fiscal year. As we close the books on last year, a small team of board members and managers traveled to the NANA region, Anchorage, Fairbanks, and Seattle to report to our shareholders on our businesses.

Sometimes we have unavoidable hiccups. Bad weather kept us from flying into some of our villages, and several meetings were rescheduled.

Like the inclement weather, the turbulent economy forces us to make adjustments, but we’re prepared.

Although the economic downturn continues to effect NANA companies—Red Dog royalties and zinc prices are down, and our businesses did not earn as much income as expected—we still had good news to report.

Our revenues continued to grow. We ended 2012 with just under $2 billion in revenues: $1,986,750,000 to be exact. We also increased the number of shareholders working for our company.

We can’t predict the weather, and we expect the world’s economy to remain unstable. We will see change for the better. Our recent investments and restructuring throughout the company should help us work our way through these difficult times.

We are committed to continued growth and success. 1n 2013, we’re confident we will cross over, and become a $2 billion revenue company!

Thanks for your hard work, which contributes to our shared success!

Helvi K. Sandvik, President
NANA Development Corporation

 
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Sandvik tells NANA story to the White House Business Council

NANA Development Corporation President Helvi Sandvik speaks at the White House as part of a forum for Business Leaders in Indian Country.
NANA Development Corporation President Helvi Sandvik speaks at the White House as part of a forum for Business Leaders in Indian Country.

NANA Development Corporation President Helvi Sandvik was a special guest at the White House last month. She was a featured speaker for a White House Forum for Business Leaders in Indian Country held in the Eisenhower Executive Office Building.

Topics included global business and internship and training opportunities for American Indian- and Alaska Native-owned firms, as well as new ideas for investment to help grow minority businesses and create jobs. The theme for the event was “Working Together, Growing Together, Doing Business Together.”

“We appreciated the invitation to participate in the forum,” said Sandvik. “We heard directly from government leaders about programs designed to facilitate economic opportunity for Native Americans. We participated in collaboration sessions with other Native leaders from across the country, to network and spur economic development.”

Several years ago, the U.S. Department of Commerce, Minority Business Development Agency (MBDA), reached out to NANA to provide mentorship and guidance to small, capable corporations and to consider international business growth by working with Indigenous people around the globe. This recent event was part of that effort.

NANA Vice President of Strategic Relationships Clyde Gooden sees this as the start of a new chapter. “NANA has been blessed with success due to hard work and great partners,” he said. “Looking to the future, we hope to build off the past, while nurturing new business relationships. As we strive for continued success, we see opportunities beyond the U.S. borders where we can work with other minority and non-minority businesses.”

Other presenters at the forum included David Hinson, national director Minority Business Development Agency; Gary Davis, president/CEO, The National Center for American Indian Enterprise Development; and Dr. Rebecca Blank, acting secretary of commerce.

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NMS employee Dawn Kimberlin wins national recognition, catches First Lady’s eye

Dawn Kimberlin, NANA Management Services director of marketing for the food, facilities and management division, was awarded a “Native American 40 Under 40” award from the National Center for American Indian Enterprise Development.
Dawn Kimberlin, NANA Management Services director of marketing for the food, facilities and management division, was awarded a “Native American 40 Under 40” award from the National Center for American Indian Enterprise Development.

It was 5:30 p.m. on a Friday in September when Dawn Kimberlin checked her email one last time before going home after a long work week. That’s when she saw the email from the National Center for American Indian Enterprise Development (NCAIED) notifying her she had won a “Native American 40 Under 40” award.

“I was in absolute disbelief,” said Kimberlin, NANA Management Services director of marketing for food and facilities management division in Anchorage. “It’s such a prestigious award and to be part of the selected group felt pretty amazing. That was a good week,” she said.

The award was created by NCAIED four years ago to acknowledge emerging Native American, Alaska Native and First Nation citizens between the ages of 18 and 39 years who have demonstrated leadership, initiative and dedication to achieve significant contributions to Native communities throughout North America. Kimberlin, 39, is the only Alaska Native receiving an award this year.

Kimberlin grew up in Fairbanks and spent many summers with her mother’s parents in Anchorage. Her grandparents, Tom and Dorothy Richards, were originally from Kotzebue. With help from the Aqqaluk Trust scholarship fund, she graduated with a degree in psychology from the University of Texas. She went on to earn a master’s degree in business administration from Alaska Pacific University with help from the Trust and NANA’s education reimbursement program. Kimberlin’s career path included working at NDC, Cook Inlet Regional Corp., the Alaska SeaLife Center and an Anchorage marketing firm before landing at her current job at NMS.

“I gained a lot of experience working outside of NANA, but I really missed the NANA family business feel,” said Kimberlin. Kimberlin was hired by NMS three years ago to oversee marketing for the lodging division. Last year she was put in charge of the food and facilities management division to market several Alaska school district food service contracts, and campus services for the University of Alaska, as well as healthcare and corporate services.

“She has a good read of her audience and her marketing materials are creative and hip,” said Penny Cotten, NMS Vice President of Marketing Communications. “Dawn has a strong business acumen and a real positive approach. Everything she produces is high quality.”

Kimberlin produced a short, low-budget video about the Kiana School students enjoying their new salad bar brought in by NMS. The project received national media attention and the endorsement of the First Lady’s “Let’s Move” program. (http://www.letsmove.gov/blog/2012/06/18/kiana-school-alaska-gets-salad-bar).

“I wouldn’t be where I am today, in business and in the rest of my life, if it wasn’t for NANA, and in receiving the award I’m proud to be an ambassador of my corporation. That’s pretty incredible.”

Kimberlin is also active in community organizations such as Rotary, Campfire and the Children’s Lunch Box. She will join other award recipients at the 37th Annual Indian Progress in Business Awards in Tulsa, Ok., next month.

To view the video visit, http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Xo4LFRpRis4.

And for more information on NMS, visit www.nmsusa.com.

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NANANordic wins success story scholarship from Alaska School Health and Wellness Institute

Amos Sage, Noatak student and shareholder, runs through the village as a training exercise for fall cross-country season. Lars Flora, retired two-time Nordic skiing Olympian visited some of the NANA region villages — Noatak included — as part of a fall-preparedness campaign for the upcoming winter Nordic skiing season.
Amos Sage, Noatak student and shareholder, runs through the village as a training exercise for fall cross-country season. Lars Flora, retired two-time Nordic skiing Olympian visited some of the NANA region villages — Noatak included — as part of a fall-preparedness campaign for the upcoming winter Nordic skiing season.

Healthy schools, bodies and minds – that is what the Alaska School Health and Wellness Institute (SHWI) promotes and NANANordic is pleased to be recognized as helping further the SHWI mission. NANANordic is one of only six Success Story Scholarships being awarded this year.

“What an honor,” Flora, a retired two-time Olympian, said. “To have a conference like this recognize the value NANANordic provides helps us so much. It brings awareness of our program to more people and helps us get more kids off the couch and into a pair of skis.”

Last year, NANANordic brought some of the best cross-country skiers in the United States to Kotzebue, Kiana, Selawik and Noorvik to teach students how to cross-country ski. This year NANANordic is planning to travel to all 11 villages.

Northwest Arctic Borough School District representative Scott Warren along with NANANordic founder Lars Flora will share their experiences with NANANordic. The two will discuss the innovative skiing program with school administration, public health officials, parents and students from across Alaska.

NANA Development Corporation Vice President of Communications and Marketing Robin Kornfield said, “I like the way NANANordic has been able to work in partnership with multiple organizations that serve the students of the NANA region. NANA, the school district, Maniilaq Association, and other corporate sponsors have joined together to make this program happen. We are just getting started, and I am looking forward to seeing even more people on skis this coming year.”

NANANordic initiated the first steps to get students ready for the upcoming winter skiing season. In September, Flora and a few of the coaches visited the villages of Buckland, Deering, Kotzebue, Noatak and Noorvik and held running camps for the students.

“It was a great chance to get to know the community before coming out in the spring,” Flora said. “I always have a blast visiting and running with the kids.”

To see photos of NANANordic, visit their Facebook page at https://www.facebook.com/#!/NanaNordic.

For more information on the Alaska School Health and Wellness Institute conference go to http://www.certain.com/system/profile/web/index.cfm?PKWebId=0x3878862a1a

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NANA shareholder employment sets new records

This summer NANA placed 32 interns in 12 NANA companies at 11 locations - the largest intern group to date. Some of the college students are pictured here. Front row, left to right: Janelle Sharp and Kristine Zajac. Middle row: Lance O’Neill, Robinson Culver, Forrest Williams, Andrea Adams, Janelle Atoruk, and Jaclynne Oyoumick. Back row: Christopher Black and Christopher Zajac.
This summer NANA placed 33 interns in 12 NANA companies at 11 locations - the largest intern group to date. Some of the college students are pictured here. Front row, left to right: Janelle Sharp and Kristine Zajac. Middle row: Lance O’Neill, Robinson Culver, Forrest Williams, Andrea Adams, Janelle Atoruk, and Jaclynne Oyoumick. Back row: Christopher Black and Christopher Zajac.

NANA set many milestones this year. However, there are none that Kristina Patrick, NANA Development Corporation’s shareholder development manager, is more proud of than NDC shareholder employment hire numbers.

This summer, NANA was able to employ and place 33 shareholder interns across 11 companies — the largest number of shareholder interns spread across the most companies to date.

“The internship is particularly important,” Patrick said. “We want to expose them to real-world work experiences, and we want them to come back and work for NANA.”

Of NANA’s 11,200 employees, 21 percent of shareholder adults are employed by NANA. For the fiscal year of 2012, NANA companies employed a total of 1,624 shareholders who collectively earned $59.7 million in wages.

“I feel that shareholder employment is one big way we accomplish our mission to improve the lives of our shareholders,” Patrick said. She often hears from others that while shareholders are grateful for the dividends NANA distributes, being employed is what they appreciate most.

This year set a record for retention and promotion of shareholders in NANA companies as well. “That’s important, it shows we are actively developing our shareholders,” Patrick said.

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Akima strategically consolidates NANA capabilities

This summer NANA placed 32 interns in 12 NANA companies at 11 locations - the largest intern group to date. Some of the college students are pictured here. Front row, left to right: Janelle Sharp and Kristine Zajac. Middle row: Lance O’Neill, Robinson Culver, Forrest Williams, Andrea Adams, Janelle Atoruk, and Jaclynne Oyoumick. Back row: Christopher Black and Christopher Zajac.
Workers hang the new Akima logo outside their office building in Herndon, Va. Akima, LLC is the new holding company that combines the services of Akima Management Services, Qivliq, LLC and Akmaaq, LLC.

On Oct. 1, Akima, LLC formally launched as a new holding company. The company, based in Herndon, Va., is absorbing all operations of the former Akima Management Services, Akmaaq and Qivliq holding companies.

“Our newly integrated, streamlined operations will improve our competitiveness and profitability,” Bill Monet, president and CEO of Akima, said.

The consolidation of the shared services of the three holding companies has been in the works for several months with the goal to increase efficiency and effectiveness. “Our new shared services model reduces our indirect costs and increases our go-to-market quality and efficiency across the board, furthering our ability to compete in ever-tighter markets,” Monet said.

Akima continues to support the diverse portfolio of federal clients and commercial partners of the former three holding companies: information technology products and services, data communications, systems and software engineering, facilities management and outfitting, cyber security, space operations, aviation, construction, fabrication and logistics.

The company’s growing, robust and stable work environment makes it an “employer of choice” in an increasingly competitive marketplace. “The federal marketplace is getting tougher. Budgets are shrinking and pressure on operating margins will only increase,” Monet said. “These market realities are the key driver of our consolidation: our integrated, streamlined operations enable us to leverage synergies between our business groups and quickly scale to seize new market opportunities.”

Integrating the companies under one holding company streamlines the benefits to shareholders, as well. “As our earnings increase, so do the benefits we offer our shareholders,” Monet said. “Our mission is to create a profitable and sustainable federal business for the benefit of our shareholders; and our new shared services model helps us fulfill this mission.”

Akima, LLC is a subsidiary of the NANA Development Corporation. For more information about the company, visit www.akima.com

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NANA in the community

Covenant House Sleep-Out

It’s cold in Anchorage right now. The days reach highs in the 20s and at night the temperature hovers around 10 degrees. It’s much too cold to be sleeping outside, and that’s why it’s important for shelters like the Covenant House of Alaska to have fundraisers like “The Sleep-Out: Executive Edition” to remain open.

This year, for the first time, Covenant House is reaching out to community leaders to discover what it is like for the more than 900 Alaska homeless youths who seek warmth and safety in the shelter of Covenant House. On Nov. 13, NANA Development President Helvi Sandvik, and Robin Kornfield, vice president of communications and marketing, will share the experience of sleeping in a youth homeless shelter.

“What we’re asking people to do is to give up their creature comforts and experience what our homeless youth experience every night,” Greg Kramer, Covenant House donor relations coordinator, said.

Participants - or “champions” as they are called - will experience a candle light vigil meant to bring awareness to homelessness; they will take an outreach tour where they’ll see where and how Covenant House workers contact homeless youth; they’ll have the opportunity to interact with some of the youth staying at the shelter; and finally they’ll experience what it’s like sleeping on the floors of the shelter for a night.

After seeing an increase in youth sleeping on the streets in Anchorage, Kornfield felt it was necessary to do something. “I have wondered how they get their lives on a healthy track, who there is to guide them and where they go to sleep and eat?” she said. “I walk quickly by, as most people do, and still I would hope if those were my children they would have a safe place to go and an adult with whom to talk to about hopes and dreams.”

So Sandvik and Kornfield need your help. Anyone can donate to support Sandvik’s and Kornfield’s Sleep Out experience by visiting the Covenant House website. The Covenant House has a goal to reach $100,000, and will be taking donations for as long as people are giving them.

For more information and to donate in support, please visit http://covhou.convio.net/site/TR/SolidaritySleepout/National?team_id=1460&pg=team&fr_id=1080

Winter's Here! Warm Clothing Needed

There is another need in Anchorage, as well: hats and gloves. And the Brother Francis Shelter needs them now.

NANA is collecting winter weather gear, specifically hats and gloves, and extra-large coats for Brother Francis. The shelter provides temporary, emergency housing for up to 300 men and women each night as well as clothing, counseling and job search assistance. But with the cold weather coming so quickly this fall, Brother Francis is already at capacity, having to send over 100 homeless individuals to the Beans Café.

Winter weather items are a popular basic need at the shelter and NANA is encouraging employees to donate as many as they can afford. They don’t have to be brand new, they just have to be useable.

And it’s not just in Alaska that we are encouraging our companies and employees to donate to their communities. The holiday season is coming up, and that is the typical time of year people donate, but for many who are homeless that could be too late. Please go through your closets and consider giving those in your community the gift of warmth today.

For Anchorage employees, you can bring or send your clothing donations to the NANA Development Corporation offices at:
1001 E. Benson Blvd., Anchorage, AK 99508
Or directly to the Brother Francis Shelter at:
3710 E. 20th Ave., Anchorage, AK 99508

Contact: Ildiko Geuss, Project Manager at, Ildiko.geuss@nana.com or visit the Brother Francis Shelter’s website, http://www.cssalaska.org/

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Cooking equipment remains top cause of home structure fires according to NFPA report

By Robert Bulger, NANA HSE & the National Fire Prevention Association

This is Fire Prevention Month! As we head into the holiday cooking season, it is important to remember cooking safety. According to a new report released by NFPA, cooking remains top cause of home structure fires. U.S. fire departments responded to an average of 371,700 home structure fires annually between 2006 and 2010. These fires caused an estimated average of 2,590 civilian deaths and $7.2 billion in direct property damage yearly.

Based on research by the Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC), the report also cited that cooking was the number one cause of home structure fires. CPSC found that in 2004-2005, for every household cooking fire reported to the fire department, U.S. households experienced 50 cooking equipment fires that they did not report.

Forty-two percent of reported home fires started in the kitchen or cooking area. These fires were the third leading cause of home fire deaths (15 percent) and leading cause of home fire injuries (37 percent).

Other notable findings from the report include:

  • Almost two-thirds of home fire deaths resulted from fires in properties without working smoke alarms.
  • Smoking materials are the leading cause of home fire deaths, followed by heating equipment and then cooking equipment.
  • Twenty-five percent of all home fire deaths were caused by fires that started in the bedroom; another 24 percent resulted from fires originating in the living room, family room or den.
  • Home fires accounted for 73 percent of all reported structure fires between 2006 and 2010.
  • Between 2006 and 2010, on average, one of every 310 households per year had a reported home fire.
  • Home structure fires peaked around the dinner hours between 5:00 and 8:00 p.m.

     

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