Having trouble reading this email? View it online.

[image]

President’s Message: Together We Make a Difference

Helvi Sandvik
Helvi Sandvik

As we head into the winter months, it is a good time to look back at the challenges and accomplishments of 2010. Hard work, a dedicated Board and great employees have helped us achieve another good year. Several members of our NANA Regional and NANA Development leadership teams recently completed Informal Shareholder meetings. We hold these meetings each year in every NANA region village, as well as Anchorage, Fairbanks and Seattle. Legally, the purpose of these meetings is to solicit nominations for the seven NRC Board seats with terms that expire in March. We take advantage of these meetings to also update our shareholders on the activities and accomplishments of their corporation. I would like to share with all of you some of the key NANA Development Corporation highlights we communicated during those meetings.

In 2010, NANA’s revenues grew to $1.5 billion — an increase of $200 million over last year. We were blessed with high zinc prices, which increased the financial contribution from the Red Dog Mine. While some of our business sectors continued to struggle with the weak economy, overall they delivered a significant financial contribution. Not surprisingly, our marketable securities investments saw very minimal growth. Together, however, these three income sources — business, resources and investments — produced an estimated net income of $33.4 million, — our second best financial year in NANA’s history.

As a company, we have set a goal of constant growth in revenue and profits each year. Each year, we re-invest in both existing companies and in new areas that we believe will deliver benefits to our shareholders long into the future.

It is gratifying to highlight a few of our tangible 2010 accomplishments:

  • NANA Oilfield Services (NOSI) celebrated the grand opening of its new 140-foot by 80-foot operations facility on the North Slope. NOSI has been doing business on the Slope for 30 years. This new facility will support company operations for another 30 years, helping NOSI reduce operational costs and ease wear on vehicles. It will also allow more safety training for NOSI employees.
  • NANA is positioning itself at the beginning of a new film industry that will feed Alaska’s economy into the future. We invested in Evergreen Films, LLC. Not only are we excited about the future financial contribution we expect this company to deliver, we also see great potential for several other NANA companies to deliver services when films are produced in Alaska.
  • Our companies that serve the federal government continue to mature and deliver services we all can be proud of all across the world. As these businesses have grown, NANA now has a business presence in all 50 states, four territories and seven countries.
  • While we invest in our businesses, we also continue to invest in our people. Spread from the north coast of Alaska in Barrow to our nation’s capital in Washington, D.C., we had 29 interns this summer working for many of our companies. The job exposure we provide these young people will help position them for the leadership positions we fully expect to see them in some day.

While we communicate and celebrate the successes of this past year, we also continue to mourn the loss of some important members of our team and our region. Former NDC Vice Chairman Lester Tuŋŋaq Hadley, Sr. passed away unexpectedly this summer and we miss him dearly.

We also lost Clay Christopher from WHPacific after a battle with kidney cancer. He was a consummate professional who led quietly by example. Qivliq employee Walter Avery passed away this year as well. He will be sorely missed.

They will not be forgotten. I am grateful for having worked with them and for the meaningful contributions they made to our corporation and to the lives of many of us.

To each of our valuable employees, thank you for your hard work. Together we are becoming stronger every day, positioning our company for many more successful years.

Sincerely,
Helvi Sandvik, President, NANA Development Corp.

 
divider
 

Safety First at the South Pole

When it’s 110° below, it’s a lot harder to remain accident free.

That’s what makes the safety record at NANA’s South Pole operations so impressive. The NANA Services Remote Support Services team at the South Pole Station in Antarctica will soon be sporting badges in honor of their achievement of 274 days of safe operations without a recordable incident or injury. The culinary team, which recently achieved 673 days of safe operations, will be issued badges as well.

The NANA Services Remote Services team will receive this special badge in honor of their achievement of 274 days of safe operations
The NANA Services Remote Services team will receive this special badge in honor of their achievement of 274 days of safe operations.

"This achievement is especially impressive when you consider the extreme environment in which our team is working, as well as the repetitive nature of their tasks," Operations Manager Dan Pickett said.

NANA Services’ role as a Raytheon Polar Services Company subcontractor includes full management of all "quality of life" support functions for National Science Foundation scientists, personnel and guests working in this remote and isolated environment. In addition to the South Pole Station, NANA Services also works at Antarctica stations McMurdo and Palmer.

Welcome to Antarctica: Each year, NANA Services mobilizes a work force to accommodate seasonal growth at the McMurdo Station, from 200 to 1200 personnel, and the South Pole Station, from 50 to 200 personnel
Welcome to Antarctica: Each year, NANA Services mobilizes a work force to accommodate seasonal growth at the McMurdo Station, from 200 to 1200 personnel, and the South Pole Station, from 50 to 200 personnel.

NANA Services has taken a proactive approach to ensuring the safety of its employees working in Antarctica. In addition to the required two 15-minute breaks a day, the staff receives an additional 15-minute stretching break designed to relax, refresh and energize. All employees receive job-specific training and hazard assessments for every task prior to beginning work.

"We’re very proud of our Antarctica team," Pickett said. "We consistently provide a high level of quality and heightened responsiveness that enables mission success."

 
divider
 

On Call in the Gulf of Mexico

Communications is critical to any emergency response, so it’s not surprising the U.S. Coast Guard (USCG) turned to Truestone to provide a wide range of communications services and capabilities for the Gulf of Mexico Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill disaster response.

Truestone is a NANA subsidiary that provides enterprise information technology and mission operations solutions to the federal government. The USCG assignment focused on communications advice and guidance to response leadership, including the Communications Coordinator (COMC) and Communications Unit Leaders (COMLs).

Truestone provided key communications services to the U.S. Coast Guard during the Gulf of Mexico Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill Disaster. Shown here are the U.S. Coast Guard cutters Bear (901) and Legare (912). Truestone provided key communications services to the U.S. Coast Guard during the Gulf of Mexico Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill Disaster. Shown here are the U.S. Coast Guard cutters Bear (901) and Legare (912).

Keith LaPlant, a member of the Truestone team well-versed in the area of Incident Command System served as a communication coordinator for the unified area command. Truestone also provided extensive on-the-job training to newly designated and assigned COMC and COML personnel in accordance with Incident Command System structure.

 
divider
 

Lending a Helping Hand in Haiti

Youth from two domestic refugee camps participated in a soccer camp which Marcel Varela helped run. Qivliq purchased new soccer equipment for the effort. Youth from two domestic refugee camps participated in a soccer camp which Marcel Varela helped run. Qivliq purchased new soccer equipment for the effort.

Marcel Varela, a systems administrator in the Qivliq IT Department, took a personal pledge to make a difference.

In July he joined Capital Church’s mission trip to Port-au-Prince, Haiti, where he and other volunteers helped with the reconstruction efforts following the devastating earthquake in January. He also helped run a soccer camp for children in two domestic refugee camps. Donations from Qivliq and other organizations helped pay his travel expenses and purchase new soccer equipment for the children.

When Marcel arrived, he found approximately 2,500 people living in 250 tents, according to Charles Ikutiminu, the mission’s director. This included about 700 children between the ages of 4 and 16, many of whom were orphans.

Qivliq systems administrator Marcel Varela helped many youth during his recent mission trip to Port-au-Prince, Haiti. Qivliq systems administrator Marcel Varela helped many youth during his recent mission trip to Port-au-Prince, Haiti.

In addition to running the soccer camp, Marcel and the volunteers arranged for portions of the 2010 World Cup in South Africa to be shown in the public square of the camps. Marcel had the opportunity to help with reconstruction as well. "I was disappointed to see how little help they are getting, but how many individuals you see around trying to help. It is my hope that my time there has been a blessing for the people we met and helped."

 
divider
 

WHPacific Engineer an Expert in Renewable Energy

Brian Yanity, an electrical engineer for WHPacific, is passionate about renewable energy projects and energy planning for rural Alaska.

He has been published twice in International Water Power and Dam Construction magazine, a publication that focuses on the hydroelectric industry. Yanity’s most recent article – an analysis of conventional and in-stream hydro power in the Yukon River watershed – was co-written with Brian Hirsch, Ph.D., senior project leader for the National Renewable Energy Laboratory’s Alaska initiative.

Yanity is currently working on a WHPacific hydroelectric feasibility study for the Alaska Village Electric Cooperative. This project would incrementally replace diesel fuel usage in the communities of Shungnak, Kobuk and Ambler with locally available hydroelectric resources. Diesel prices reported by many rural utilities in 2009 were in the range of $4 to $5 a gallon, with a few above $7.

The scope of work includes permitting, environmental and wetland delineation, hydrology/stream gauging, conceptual design and site surveying. "Right now we’re working on gathering streamflow data. This summer we focused on the preliminary environmental fieldwork. The project could potentially provide electricity to those communities in Northwest Alaska for half the year," Yanity said.

Yanity earned a bachelor’s degree in electrical engineering from Columbia University and a master’s degree in arctic engineering from the University of Alaska Anchorage. To link to the September 2010 article, click here. To link to the August 2009 article, click here.

 
divider
 

New President for Sivuniq

Sivuniq, Inc. welcomes the arrival of its new president, Brad Chastain, a long-time Alaskan with an extensive resume.

Chastain brings more than 23 years of professional experience to Sivuniq in the areas of environmental management; technical consulting; health, safety; security and environmental (HSSE) management systems; and federal program business development.

Sivuniq's new president Brad Chastain shows off a King crab haul from the waters of Southeast Alaska. Sivuniq's new president Brad Chastain shows off a King crab haul from the waters of Southeast Alaska.

Sivuniq is a member of the NANA-owned Akmaaq, LLC family of companies. Akmaaq provides professional services to government and commercial clients in Alaska, Hawaii, the Lower 48 and Antarctica.

Sivuniq, which means "the future" in Iñupiaq, supplies integrated and stand-alone environmental and construction support services. Headquartered in Anchorage, the company’s strategic vision focuses on growth as the center of environmental service capabilities within the overall NANA family. Sivuniq targets growth opportunities through specialized environmental service lines, client diversification and geographic expansion, including a planned new office opening in Huntsville, Ala., this calendar year.

A long-time Alaska resident, Chastain grew up in Petersburg and has lived in Anchorage since 1989. His career includes environmental response and remediation program management with Alyeska Pipeline Service Company, HSSE management system standardization across BP’s U.S. Upstream Business Units, professional consulting services for the oil and gas industry, national and international marketing, and business development and federal SBA 8(a) business management.

"Our vision is for Sivuniq to achieve a sustainable core environmental services capability and growth profile which has a meaningful presence in the market, while providing exceptional service to our customers and support for our Inupiat shareholders, now and in the future," Chastain said. "I am personally very proud and excited about the opportunity to work within the diverse and unique family of NANA companies."

 
divider
 

Teck Named ‘Best in Class’ for Sustainability Practices

Teck logo

Teck Resources, the operator of the Red Dog Mine, earned the "best in class" designation from the Dow Jones Sustainability World Index (DJSI), which puts Teck’s sustainability practices in the top 10 percent of companies in the resource industry worldwide.

DJSI ranked Teck in the top 20 percent of the resource industry in North America last year. Upgrading from the North American index to the world index is a significant accomplishment.

TECK operates the Red Dog Mine on land owned by NANA. TECK operates the Red Dog Mine on land owned by NANA.

"This is an important milestone made possible by teamwork and collaboration across the company, from the Board and executives to every worker in our operation," Teck CEO Don Lindsay said. "Our commitment to sustainability encompasses many areas, including worker safety, environmental practices and community engagement and development."

Lindsay noted that Teck’s rating on the DJSI has steadily improved over the past four years. The company set ambitious targets and consistently worked to develop its capacity to contribute to sustainability.

"The DJSI is an important tool for continuous improvement," Lindsay said. "It’s a crucial way for us to benchmark and challenge ourselves every year."

For information on the DJSI, visit www.sustainability-indexes.com.

 
divider
 

Akmaaq Employees ‘Dig’ New
Volleyball Team

The Akmaaq Awesomeness team jersey. The "Akmaaq Awesomeness" team jersey.

The Anchorage Sports Volleyball League has a new team this season – the "Akmaaq Awesomeness." Akmaaq President Jonathan Widdis agreed to sponsor a company team featuring employees of Akmaaq and its subsidiary companies.

The teams play reverse coed volleyball, which means two men and four women are on the court at any given time. It’s reverse because the men are the "setters" and aren’t allowed to spike or jump to block the ball coming over the net. So far, the Akmaaq team has enjoyed its season and hopes to continue into the spring.

Team members include Akmaaq employees Kimberlee Greenway, David Schwartz, Brittney McConnell, Tracey Ramsey and Apha Porter, along with Jessica Bowman from Sivuniq. Spouses and friends make up the rest of the 10-person ensemble.

Want to watch a game? Akmaaq plays several more matches this season. Schedules can be found on the Anchorage Sports website by clicking "volleyball" and "RCC" for dates and times.

Go team Akmaaq!

 
divider
 

How to Protect Yourself During
Flu Season

Flu Shots

In addition to covering your mouth when you cough or sneeze, washing your hands often and avoiding close contact with sick people, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control recommends a flu vaccine as the first and most important step in protecting against flu viruses.

The flu vaccine protects against the three viruses that research suggests will be most common, including the H1N1 virus that caused so much illness last season. Everyone six months of age and older should get vaccinated. People at high risk of serious flu complications include young children, pregnant women, people with chronic health conditions like asthma, diabetes or heart and lung disease and people 65 years and older.

For information, visit www.cdc.gov/flu/ or www.flu.gov.

 
divider
 

‘Tis the Season to be Healthy and Happy!

Santa with Apple

Heightened stress, lack of sleep and exercise, rich meals and calorie-laden beverages – by the time New Years rolls around, many of us are worn-out, battle-weary versions of our former selves. Not taking care of yourself during the holidays can increase your risk of illness and may lead to long-term unhealthy habits. Fortunately, it’s easy to enjoy good health this holiday season by following a few simple tips. Commit to celebrating the season in good health by:

Eating well

  • Mind your portions
  • Minimize processed foods
  • Fill up on fruits, vegetables, lean protein and fiber-rich whole grains
  • Drink water instead of sugary sodas and cocktails

Getting enough rest

  • Adults require 7-9 hours/night

Not overindulging in alcohol – and if you do, don’t drink and drive!

Making exercise a priority

  • Health professionals recommend moderately intense aerobic activity 30 minutes a day, five days a week. But any activity – even a lap or two around the mall – is better than none!

Washing your hands often to avoid getting sick and spreading germs

Bundling up to stay dry and keep warm

For more healthy tips, visit www.cdc.gov/HealthyLiving/.

[image]
[image]

 

 

 

Having trouble reading this email? View it online.

NANA Development Corporation
1001 East Benson Blvd.
Anchorage, AK 99508

www.nana-dev.com
e-news@nana.com